Travel Destinations
Follow these links to learn about the different parts of Cairo and the sites that each area offers. Old Cairo and Coptic Cairo refer to the oldest areas of settlement, predating the founding of Cairo and the arrival of Islam in Egypt. Islamic Cairo is the historic core of the city, built as the capital of the Fatimid Caliphate during the 10th century and full of beautiful medieval Islamic architecture. Downtown Cairo is the youngest area of the city. Built during the second part of the 19th century as the city expanded and modeled on the great cities of Europe, it is the heart of modern Cairo.

Points Of Interset :
At the height of the Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom (1549—1069 BC) its capital, Thebes (Luxor), was a city of over a million people. The pharaohs that ruled over this kingdom were made wealthy by military successes that expanded their influence south into Nubia, west along the Mediterranean, and east into modern day Syria.

This wealth and the huge workforce at their disposal made it possible for the New Kingdom pharaohs to commission great building projects, attempting to immortalize their influence through the buildings they left behind. Today in Luxor we still admire the efforts of these pharaohs to preserve their legacies in the great temple and funerary complexes that still stand on either side of the Nile at the site of ancient Thebes.

Luxor is often referred to today as the ‘world’s largest open-air museum’. This name comes from the fact that the modern city is located at the same site as ancient Thebes. It has literally been built upon and around the treasures of the Old Kingdom, which are still being unearthed to this day.

Surrounded by modern construction, Luxor Temple and the massive Karnak Temple Complex are two of Egypt’s most impressive sites. Their impact is only enhanced by the contrast of their ancient stone architecture with the modern construction that surrounds them.

Additionally, the area around Luxor and the opposite bank of the river are dotted with a wealth of other temples and tombs. It can take several days to explore all of the significant archeological sites within only an hours drive of Luxor with each one displaying something unique that will add to your understanding of this ancient civilization that flowered here.
Due to its location below to the northern-most cataract on the Nile, Aswan marked the traditional southern frontier of Egypt with rival Nubia. Throughout ancient history the Nubians competed with the Egyptian pharaohs for territory and influence as their power ebbed and waned; however, Aswan remained the natural border between them.

It was not only a political boundary, but also a natural economic intersection and the city thrived as trading post and gateway between Egypt and the rest of Africa. North of Aswan the river is navigable all the way to the Mediterranean Sea so overland trade routes, caravans of elephants and camels carrying valuable goods from the south, converged here to load their goods onto boats traveling north Egypt and beyond.

Aswan’s location at the cataract has continued to shape its history even in modern times. During Egypt’s colonial era, Aswan was a staging ground for Anglo-Egyptian forces heading south to quell unrest in Sudan. After this at the close of the 19th century, Aswan grew into a tourist destination with its warm winter weather attracting European travelers, who sought to escape the cold in their homelands.

Today it is still a must-see tourist destination in Egypt, famous for beautiful scenery along the Nile and the Nubian culture that is still a strong influence in southern Egypt. Construction of the controversial High Dam in 1964, displaced nearly 100,000 Nubian people who lived along the banks of the river.

Many of these people now live in and around Aswan and make a living from tourism either by manufacturing and selling traditional Nubian goods or in other cultural displays.
Sailing the Nile along the lush Nile Valley surrounded by golden dunes and sightseeing Ancient Egyptian monuments such as Kom Ombo and Abu Simbel is tourism at its best.
A Nile cruise tour, is like a floating hotel that takes you sightseeing. Unpack once and go. Cruise boats sail to most of Ancient Egypt’s iconic landmarks you’ve dreamed of visiting. The cruise sails between Cairo and Luxor, Cairo and Aswan and covers the best of Egypt’s sightseeing experiences coupled with luxury transport and accommodation. Ports include enchanting destinations like Luxor, Esna, Edfu, Kom Ombo, Aswan, Qena, Fayoum, Cairo and more. Cruise ships offer features such as panoramic views, broad decks, TV broadcasts of the Nile view and supper clubs. Note that different cruise boats have different programmes. Wake to the soft light of the morning sun, take in the heat and cool off in the pool on the deck of a cruiser; watch fishermen cast their nets, farmers take to their fields, a flight of birds, and water buffalos staring back at you. Book a Nile cruise and you just might unravel another layer of the mystery that is Ancient Egypt.
 
The available dates of sailing are as below: